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Hi ! //

ARTISTA VISUAL & estudiante de Diseño Industrial -America del Sur
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VISUAL ARTIST & Industrial Designer student South America
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worclip:

Stool+ by Marta Morawska

Project modifies the well known form of a piece of furniture so that one movement allows a user to transform it and add new ways of use. The starting point of the design process was the observation of elderly people using a stool in the kitchen. Base form of this piece of furniture is a classic stool. By adding a pop-up element Stool+ gets new features: back rest, support while getting up and in semi-sitting position and small table. The solid ash wood Stool+ is constructed in a way enabling withstanding heavy loads and ensuring durability of use.
worclip:

Stool+ by Marta Morawska

Project modifies the well known form of a piece of furniture so that one movement allows a user to transform it and add new ways of use. The starting point of the design process was the observation of elderly people using a stool in the kitchen. Base form of this piece of furniture is a classic stool. By adding a pop-up element Stool+ gets new features: back rest, support while getting up and in semi-sitting position and small table. The solid ash wood Stool+ is constructed in a way enabling withstanding heavy loads and ensuring durability of use.
worclip:

Stool+ by Marta Morawska

Project modifies the well known form of a piece of furniture so that one movement allows a user to transform it and add new ways of use. The starting point of the design process was the observation of elderly people using a stool in the kitchen. Base form of this piece of furniture is a classic stool. By adding a pop-up element Stool+ gets new features: back rest, support while getting up and in semi-sitting position and small table. The solid ash wood Stool+ is constructed in a way enabling withstanding heavy loads and ensuring durability of use.
worclip:

Stool+ by Marta Morawska

Project modifies the well known form of a piece of furniture so that one movement allows a user to transform it and add new ways of use. The starting point of the design process was the observation of elderly people using a stool in the kitchen. Base form of this piece of furniture is a classic stool. By adding a pop-up element Stool+ gets new features: back rest, support while getting up and in semi-sitting position and small table. The solid ash wood Stool+ is constructed in a way enabling withstanding heavy loads and ensuring durability of use.
worclip:

Stool+ by Marta Morawska

Project modifies the well known form of a piece of furniture so that one movement allows a user to transform it and add new ways of use. The starting point of the design process was the observation of elderly people using a stool in the kitchen. Base form of this piece of furniture is a classic stool. By adding a pop-up element Stool+ gets new features: back rest, support while getting up and in semi-sitting position and small table. The solid ash wood Stool+ is constructed in a way enabling withstanding heavy loads and ensuring durability of use.
worclip:

Stool+ by Marta Morawska

Project modifies the well known form of a piece of furniture so that one movement allows a user to transform it and add new ways of use. The starting point of the design process was the observation of elderly people using a stool in the kitchen. Base form of this piece of furniture is a classic stool. By adding a pop-up element Stool+ gets new features: back rest, support while getting up and in semi-sitting position and small table. The solid ash wood Stool+ is constructed in a way enabling withstanding heavy loads and ensuring durability of use.
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photogra-ph:

superbambi | scoope design
photogra-ph:

superbambi | scoope design
photogra-ph:

superbambi | scoope design
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polygonal:

SPOT, an adaptable light that can be held, hung or set on a surface. 
polygonal:

SPOT, an adaptable light that can be held, hung or set on a surface. 
polygonal:

SPOT, an adaptable light that can be held, hung or set on a surface. 
polygonal:

SPOT, an adaptable light that can be held, hung or set on a surface. 
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ippinka:

Click and Grow is an automatic plant growing system which can grow plants without watering and fertilizing.
ippinka:

Click and Grow is an automatic plant growing system which can grow plants without watering and fertilizing.
ippinka:

Click and Grow is an automatic plant growing system which can grow plants without watering and fertilizing.
ippinka:

Click and Grow is an automatic plant growing system which can grow plants without watering and fertilizing.
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projectneo:

Chuck, by German designer Natascha Harra-Frischkorn. A flexible wall shelf made from six 4mm thick wooden floors, that can be adjusted to hold books and other small objects in a stunning organic shape. 
projectneo:

Chuck, by German designer Natascha Harra-Frischkorn. A flexible wall shelf made from six 4mm thick wooden floors, that can be adjusted to hold books and other small objects in a stunning organic shape. 
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worclip:

Cable Lights by Patrick Hartog

Mooring bollards widely seen on wharves inspired Patrick Hartog to create this ceramic cable lights. The cable is wrapped around the light and gives an unique look to the simple but aesthetic looking shade.  The lights can be customized to the likes of the user, different colored or patterned cables directly result in a different looking shade. The metal ring on top makes sure the light is balanced and is a link to the original bollards often created from strong metal. To be fully appreciated the Small Cable lights could be hanged together. For other situations Patrick is now developing a large Cable Light.
worclip:

Cable Lights by Patrick Hartog

Mooring bollards widely seen on wharves inspired Patrick Hartog to create this ceramic cable lights. The cable is wrapped around the light and gives an unique look to the simple but aesthetic looking shade.  The lights can be customized to the likes of the user, different colored or patterned cables directly result in a different looking shade. The metal ring on top makes sure the light is balanced and is a link to the original bollards often created from strong metal. To be fully appreciated the Small Cable lights could be hanged together. For other situations Patrick is now developing a large Cable Light.
worclip:

Cable Lights by Patrick Hartog

Mooring bollards widely seen on wharves inspired Patrick Hartog to create this ceramic cable lights. The cable is wrapped around the light and gives an unique look to the simple but aesthetic looking shade.  The lights can be customized to the likes of the user, different colored or patterned cables directly result in a different looking shade. The metal ring on top makes sure the light is balanced and is a link to the original bollards often created from strong metal. To be fully appreciated the Small Cable lights could be hanged together. For other situations Patrick is now developing a large Cable Light.
worclip:

Cable Lights by Patrick Hartog

Mooring bollards widely seen on wharves inspired Patrick Hartog to create this ceramic cable lights. The cable is wrapped around the light and gives an unique look to the simple but aesthetic looking shade.  The lights can be customized to the likes of the user, different colored or patterned cables directly result in a different looking shade. The metal ring on top makes sure the light is balanced and is a link to the original bollards often created from strong metal. To be fully appreciated the Small Cable lights could be hanged together. For other situations Patrick is now developing a large Cable Light.
worclip:

Cable Lights by Patrick Hartog

Mooring bollards widely seen on wharves inspired Patrick Hartog to create this ceramic cable lights. The cable is wrapped around the light and gives an unique look to the simple but aesthetic looking shade.  The lights can be customized to the likes of the user, different colored or patterned cables directly result in a different looking shade. The metal ring on top makes sure the light is balanced and is a link to the original bollards often created from strong metal. To be fully appreciated the Small Cable lights could be hanged together. For other situations Patrick is now developing a large Cable Light.
worclip:

Cable Lights by Patrick Hartog

Mooring bollards widely seen on wharves inspired Patrick Hartog to create this ceramic cable lights. The cable is wrapped around the light and gives an unique look to the simple but aesthetic looking shade.  The lights can be customized to the likes of the user, different colored or patterned cables directly result in a different looking shade. The metal ring on top makes sure the light is balanced and is a link to the original bollards often created from strong metal. To be fully appreciated the Small Cable lights could be hanged together. For other situations Patrick is now developing a large Cable Light.
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nkulikowski:

3D printing expert Janne Kyttanen has produced prototype printed pasta, breakfast cereal and burgers to demonstrate how advances in 3D printing could transform the way we eat (+ interview + slideshow) 
via Dezeen
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socalledcopy:

3D printer + IKEA hack = toddler bike
It’s nothing new to make your own furniture out of the build-it sets sold at IKEA. What I like is about this hack is that since people can print their own extra parts, it’s no longer just about finding the right screw and drilling a few new holes to turn your bookcase into a side table. Now, it’s printing out the pieces you need at home to help hack yourself a whole new product.
What happens when 3D printing is so mainstream that getting the pieces you need, in the exact colours you want is just a click away? What happens when the flat pack isn’t the cheapest and smartest way to have the home furnishings you want at a price you can afford? What happens when printing a BILLY bookcase wins over tackling the IKEA store on a Saturday, no matter how good those hotdogs are?
3D printing should be a wake up call for most businesses that sell “things”. But it doesn’t mean they have to end up like Kodak or Blockbuster. Like the always fictitious but often wise Don Draper says, “If you don’t like what’s being said, change the conversation.” As long as companies know who their customers are, selling them what they want and need should be the easy part.
If customers don’t like or no longer need what’s being sold to them, change the sale. Adapt. It will be exciting to see if IKEA is able to do that, when and if it becomes necessary.
Until then, try your hand at making the FROSTA stool bike here. Or maybe just print one of your own at home.
via: grist
socalledcopy:

3D printer + IKEA hack = toddler bike
It’s nothing new to make your own furniture out of the build-it sets sold at IKEA. What I like is about this hack is that since people can print their own extra parts, it’s no longer just about finding the right screw and drilling a few new holes to turn your bookcase into a side table. Now, it’s printing out the pieces you need at home to help hack yourself a whole new product.
What happens when 3D printing is so mainstream that getting the pieces you need, in the exact colours you want is just a click away? What happens when the flat pack isn’t the cheapest and smartest way to have the home furnishings you want at a price you can afford? What happens when printing a BILLY bookcase wins over tackling the IKEA store on a Saturday, no matter how good those hotdogs are?
3D printing should be a wake up call for most businesses that sell “things”. But it doesn’t mean they have to end up like Kodak or Blockbuster. Like the always fictitious but often wise Don Draper says, “If you don’t like what’s being said, change the conversation.” As long as companies know who their customers are, selling them what they want and need should be the easy part.
If customers don’t like or no longer need what’s being sold to them, change the sale. Adapt. It will be exciting to see if IKEA is able to do that, when and if it becomes necessary.
Until then, try your hand at making the FROSTA stool bike here. Or maybe just print one of your own at home.
via: grist
socalledcopy:

3D printer + IKEA hack = toddler bike
It’s nothing new to make your own furniture out of the build-it sets sold at IKEA. What I like is about this hack is that since people can print their own extra parts, it’s no longer just about finding the right screw and drilling a few new holes to turn your bookcase into a side table. Now, it’s printing out the pieces you need at home to help hack yourself a whole new product.
What happens when 3D printing is so mainstream that getting the pieces you need, in the exact colours you want is just a click away? What happens when the flat pack isn’t the cheapest and smartest way to have the home furnishings you want at a price you can afford? What happens when printing a BILLY bookcase wins over tackling the IKEA store on a Saturday, no matter how good those hotdogs are?
3D printing should be a wake up call for most businesses that sell “things”. But it doesn’t mean they have to end up like Kodak or Blockbuster. Like the always fictitious but often wise Don Draper says, “If you don’t like what’s being said, change the conversation.” As long as companies know who their customers are, selling them what they want and need should be the easy part.
If customers don’t like or no longer need what’s being sold to them, change the sale. Adapt. It will be exciting to see if IKEA is able to do that, when and if it becomes necessary.
Until then, try your hand at making the FROSTA stool bike here. Or maybe just print one of your own at home.
via: grist
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archiemcphee:

Sunrises are wonderful, but let’s not forget that moonrises are also beautiful to behold. Los Angeles-based artist and motion designer Dan Marker-Moore created the awesome photo and gif you see above revealing the path of the moon as it rose over Los Angeles. The photo is actually a combination of 11 separate photos taken over the course of 27 minutes and 59 seconds.
Click here to watch Dan’s time-lapse video of the moonrise.
[via Twisted Sifter]
archiemcphee:

Sunrises are wonderful, but let’s not forget that moonrises are also beautiful to behold. Los Angeles-based artist and motion designer Dan Marker-Moore created the awesome photo and gif you see above revealing the path of the moon as it rose over Los Angeles. The photo is actually a combination of 11 separate photos taken over the course of 27 minutes and 59 seconds.
Click here to watch Dan’s time-lapse video of the moonrise.
[via Twisted Sifter]